You aren’t going to do anything about poverty until you do something about education

July 30, 2015

(Guest Post by Matthew Ladner)

The above line (from then NYC Chancellor Joel Klein) in the headline came to mind when I saw these cool charts on the New Orleans Recovery School District from Neerav Kingsland. RSD turns 10 this year and the results thus far look very impressive.

So the percentage of kids eligible for a FRL not only went up, it is sky-high at 92%. Meanwhile test scores climbed. How in the world did New Orleans accomplish these goals without hiring armies of new unionized social workers, dentists and valets are various other things that could be neither afforded nor sustained? Oh that’s right they leveraged (then) empty buildings to attract teams of educators to run charter schools and gave parents a much wider array of choices regarding the sort of school their child would attend.


Alaska on top (for now) while the Euro Zone, Alabama, Britain and Mississippi bring up the rear

August 27, 2014

GDP

(Guest Post by Matthew Ladner)

Readers of a certain age will recall the days when European films got over 10% of the American box office. I recall being told that this was the thing to do, but being fairly consistently disappointed with the products. European governments are apparently willing to subsidize bad films on an ongoing basis, but I was not. Eventually the American public also found better ways to spend their entertainment dollars, and European film-going shrank in America.

It looks to me like the devotion of some Americans to European economic policies deserve the same fate. Even our versions of small population/big oil territories (Alaska and North Dakota) beat the stuffing out of their version (Norway). Germany is the economic titan of Europe but finds itself sandwiched between Montana and Arizona. Move an American state with a large population and high-end GDP per capita to Europe (say New York or Texas) and there would be a new sheriff in town.

Read the WaPo for more.  Someone explain to me again why the PISA rankings would look so much different than the economic rankings. Don’t bother trying to say that there is poverty in Alabama but none in the Euro zone because I’m not buying it. The last per student spending rankings I saw had Alaska (the top state at GDP per head) at $18,000 per year per kid and NAEP says 42% of the 4th graders score below basic in reading. It would be a great idea to concentrate on getting bigger bang for the buck because, ahem, well…